Welcome

A Memory Tree is designed to enhance the lives of others by helping to record, share and remember special moments, events and people. At http://www.amemorytree.co.nz/ you can currently search tens of thousands of death listings that were published in every daily New Zealand newspaper since December 2006, the most comprehensive search available.

In addition to our website we wanted to create a space where people can share their views on related topics ; death, dying, family history and memories.

This is our blog.

Published in: on December 15, 2008 at 1:16 am  Comments (2)  
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Advertising works!

Does the latest NZTA advertising – Flying Objects – work?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV5o_-UADiY&list=UU78_c39pdtSN7jipO82DRyw&index=3&feature=plcp

For me graphic images of necks breaking and organs being squashed certainly makes an impact. I guess I’m a visual learner as, since this latest campaign, I have found myself thinking of just how superhuman I am not!

Years ago I took a course of nictoine patches to stop smoking. The patches caused sleepless night and after three weeks, and with my eyeballs hanging out, I went cold turkey. However, I held onto a pamphlet which came with the pack that had picture of a smokers hardened artery squeezed of it’s contents – a common image now found cigarette packs as a warning for those who cant break the habit. That image helped me stop smoking and stay smoke-free for ten years! http://whyquit.com/whyquit/linksjblood.html

Yesterday I received a very graphic email from a friend in Australia of a car and truck accident caused by the driver who was texting his girlfriend drifted into the oncoming truck. The site of the mangled vehicles pailed in comparision to those of the dismembered body of the young man. That image wont leave my head for many years to come. And while I dont text and drive anyway, there is no way I will now!

Shock theraphy certainly is one way to get safety messages through to us. Death being the ultimate price we pay for our poor choices.

I believe, in times when a million messages are bombarded at us daily, we’ve become discerning in both what we pay attention to and what suits us to pay attention to. The NZTA and their advertising agency have hit the nail on the head with this latest campaign … it is often the unslightly reminders of our fragility (mangled bodies) that make us sit up and pay attention.

Road deaths in Australasia continue to climb and while we can not control the actions of others, we can control our own. None of us is superhuman and innocent people lose their lives every day on our roads, we need to keep road safety at the forefront of everyone’s minds.

Speeding, drinking, drugs, distraction, tiredness are all extremely dangerous. The moment you turn the key and put your car into drive, remember you are in charge of a potentially lethal, life-ending weapon .

Finally, “youth drink-driving is one of the largest causes of death and injuries in New Zealand roads. Each year, young drivers cause nearly half of all alcohol-related road crashes.” source www.nzta.govt.nz

Be a legend http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIYvD9DI1ZA1,836,318 hits to date!

Drive Safe!!!!

 

Published in: on March 9, 2012 at 2:11 pm  Leave a Comment  

Mystery of Beached Human Ashes Solved on A Memory Tree

When you need to find someone – try google or go directly to A Memory Tree!

A recent case of a box containing human ashes turning up on a Christchurch beach failed to find the person through the official channels, www.dia.govt.nz, but did show up on A Memory Tree.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/press-communities/5122535/Human-ashes-mystery-solved

All deaths that are published in NZ daily papers are recorded on www.amemorytree.co.nz and the friendly freely available searches include all name variations. In a nut shell, if it’s published, we record it.

That includes favoured names, nee names, former names, even nick names.

We’re pleased to be able to have helped the NZ Police when all other official channels failed!

Published in: on June 9, 2011 at 9:13 pm  Leave a Comment  

Suicide – we need to talk about it, but how? where? and when?

This article raising the need to talk about suicide is an interesting one. Your thoughts? http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/5076808/Let-bereaved-speak-out-to-help-save-other-lives

Published in: on May 31, 2011 at 11:22 am  Comments (2)  

Dig Deep for Earthquake Victims

These past few days have been the hardest for me personally and professionally.

 You will find the list of the men, women and children whose innocent lives were lost in our city’s earthquake on 22/2/2011 on www.amemorytree.co.nz as their names are released.

As I write this, 103 are confirmed dead. There will be many widows, orphans and childless parents in not only our country but throughout the world.

 Trust Funds that are be being set up for these families will be published on the victims memory pages. Please give generously. 

While money cant ever replace what has been lost, it will help them tremendously as they try to rebuild their lives. EVERY little bit will make a difference.

 For those of us lucky to escape with our lives, the Red Cross is a phenomenal organisation. We lost our home last September, we have now lost another. Displacement is a horrible experience, as is losing your treasured momentos, and having access to the services and grants the Red Cross have given at these times is without doubt as vital as the air we breathe. Please help them, continue to help those in Christchurch.

Finally, before this latest catastrophe the city was almost starting to rebuild itself but was feeling forgotten as it struggled through months of basic services missing and over 4,000 aftershocks. Please don’t forget us, tell us you are with us in spirit. You can do this on A Memory Tree.

I hate that what I feel so passionately about, sharing memories and condolences, has hit so close to home and with such overwhelming force. I can only believe as I am still passionate (with a breaking heart) that this is what I have been destined to do in my lifetime.

Thank you for your support of me, but most importantly the support you can provide for the families and affected people in Christchurch and further afield.

Please pass this post on to your network of friends and acquaintances so that they are able to also help at this time.

Go well, keep safe and support each other,

Sue

Published in: on February 26, 2011 at 1:15 am  Leave a Comment  

A Big Shake Up

Ok so the title of this post is a bit twee but having recently been through the Christchurch Earthquake, and all that has followed, it does seem apt.

On 4th September there was a 7.1 earthquake in my home city of Christchurch. The quake struck just after 4.30am and I had four kids in the house. Like a mother-hen I gathered them together and we fled for our garage spending the remaining dark hours in nooks and crannies there.

Long story short, after thousands of aftershocks (yes, thousands!) we, like everyone else in the city, survived. It was nothing short of miraculous.

Our home has not been so fortunate but everything that was lost and broken can be repaired or replaced.

Later that day, on the other side of the South Island, nine innocent lives were lost when a skydving plane crashed on take-off at Fox Glacier. A month later five cyclists died in as many days. My heart broke when we created a page for a young mother and her unborn child lost in a car accident.

Then last week, back on the West Coast, the Pike River Coal Mine claimed 29 lives when a series of explosions occurred 2km underground.

International media flocked to report on the miners plight and we witnessed those in charge having to make some excruiatingly difficult choices to hold back rescue efforts as the mine remained unstable with high levels of toxic gases.

I wondered what I would have done just a few months earlier, during the big quake, had any of my children been trapped in a situation that was life threatening for me to save them. I feel certain I would have thrown myself into a fire to save anyone of them if even there was the smallest chance they were alive. So I can only imagine the pain and anger that the grieving families feel for the loss of their loved ones – the fathers, brothers, sons and uncles – who they may never be able to recover from the depths of the mine now.

How can all the families cope with such sudden and unexpected losses?

Some will argue that skydiving and coal mining are dangerous things to do and come with inherent risks. But that doesnt quite cut it for me. These losses are huge and it seems the West Coast has had more than its fair share of tragedy.

Then last weekend I went to the funeral of a friend who died after a long and courageous battle with cancer. He was only 47. We’d met almost 30 years ago and, while not close friends, we’ve been in touch over the years through other friends. He leaves behind two small children and a beautiful, strong and wonderful wife.

It struck me how grossly unfair losing someone is, whether it’s unexpected or not, and that we are faced with our own mortality and our loved ones everyday. But then, at my friends funeral, the Reverend officiating poetically put things in such a way that reminded me that it’s not about what we’ve lost, its what we’ve had and what we’ve got to give now that matters. It was uplifting and motivating and I wanted to share it.

For the fatherless children, some too young to ever really know their fathers, we have a duty to remember their Dad, to share the stories we have, to write down our memories and, most importantly, not avoid the families because we dont know what to say.

Even though they may, for some time, reject our offers for a visit, outing or catch-up, dont give up or disppear from their lives, they have already lost too much.

Keep in touch, and the time will come when they will say “Yes”

These past few months, even though I have all the excuses in the world, has given me a big shake up. I am not a good friend, I’m hopeless at keeping in touch as I get consumed in work and family and work … and family …… and ……

I know I need to re-evaluate my priorities and not lose sight of the big picture …… life as we know it is finite, so best get on and live it well!

Published in: on November 30, 2010 at 12:41 pm  Leave a Comment  

Media Release – Gift Giver Creates 100,000th Page

This week the 100,000th online Remembrance Page was created on the uniquely New Zealand website www.amemorytree.co.nz.  What makes this special is that all pages created, were done so for free and gifted to the friends and families of the deceased by a Christchurch woman following her own loss.

Site creator and managing director, Sue Skeet, says that giving is the essence of site and to be able to gift its 100,000th page for others to record their memories, messages and condolences is a significant milestone not only for her personally but also the wider community.

“It’s really important for us to provide a place where it costs nothing to leave a message of support or share a fond memory and the site has been developed to ensure access for all is possible.

“At any time we have over 2,000 pages active with hundreds of messages and virtual flowers being left on them every day.

Death may be an uncomfortable subject for many but Sue says providing an online service seems to be helping a huge number of people.

Since launching last January, the site achieves up to 30,000 visitors each month from over 80 countries and it offers the most comprehensive list of deaths in the country, drawing together death information published in over 20 newspapers. Over 75% of their pages have activity on them.

“It’s a very humbling experience to be able to provide the forum for so many people to use to remember, celebrate and share their memories,” Sue added.

As well as the bereaved Sue says, genealogists and lawyers are finding site useful to locate people, particularly lawyers when it comes to managing their Will records. Given the demand, A Memory Tree has developed a death notification service to help certain business groups such as the legal, accounting and insurance industries indentify their clients.

“Responsible businesses are fast accepting that timely notification of a clients death helps them not only undertake whatever legal responsibilities they may have and remove the person from their mailing lists, but also acknowledge the passing. It’s very powerful, as customers are once again being recognized as people not just a client number in a huge database.

“While that seems like an old fashioned value in today’s fast- paced world, it is one that customers, and their survivors, want to find in business. Coupled with hearing from the community and their friends from all over the world, it’s very powerful.

“ I feel we’re doing our bit to help bring the human face back and that feels really good.” she added.

A Memory Tree creates and gifts Remembrance Pages for all its listings. The pages are open to the community for 21 days, after which they are archived but available for future or ongoing messages. Sue reports that many use the pages to have final conversations with the deceased, remember special moments spent together, make tribute to a friend, mark an anniversary or special family occasion, and connect with old friends and distant relatives.

The most popular features on the Remembrance Pages are the refresh flowers and light candle options with over two million being refreshed and lit. Complete published death records date back to 2006.

Published in: on June 14, 2010 at 7:49 pm  Leave a Comment  

The Good Man Project

Recently I received a newsletter from Shirley Boys High School in Christchurch New Zealand and while I normally give such things a cursory glance, one article written by the principal John Laurenson caught my attention. To any parent or guardian of a young man, this is a must read. …

The Shirley Man by John Laurenson.

I believe strongly that the key to the continued development of our school lies in our ability to maintain the development of a positive culture, based firmly upon what we know as The Shirley Man.

The Shirley Man has its roots in The Good Man project, a joint venture by a number of schools, including Shirley Boys High School, which began after 2000 under the leadership of Celia Lashlie.

At the centre of The Good Man project was the conviction that a school which focuses solely on subject curriculum, could not prepare a young man for success in life.

This paper attempts to outline some of the vital aspects of personal development that a young man needs, but will only be delivered if parents and school work together to ensure that it is made available for young men.

The list that follows is not exhaustive, it is not meant to be, but it will outline a good deal of what is important and needed.

So what does a young man need? A serious response to that question might include the following:

  • The ability to create good and positive relationships with people from all walks of life and from all ages.
  • The ability to absorb and use language that expresses a wide range of emotions and feelings.
  • The ability to know where one stands as far as belief and opinion is concerned, and to justify that stance.
  • The ability of an individual to control emotion and impulse and to recognise that love, and sex are not necessarily the same thing.
  • The ability to be practical which includes everything from the ability to manage finances, through to such as changing a tyre, painting, changing a tap washer and so on.
  • The ability to treat others with respect and to be polite at all times.
  • The ability to accept responsibility.
  • The ability to be resilient and deal with grief and loss.

Let’s look at some of the above in greater detail.

Relationships.

I am now dealing with an increasing number of young men who are caught in the soulless electronic world of Twitter, Bebo, Facebook, SMS and MMS.

Frankly in such a world a young man’s ability to relate to other human beings is compromised. Real people get angry, they laugh and they cry, they eat too much, or too little, they get flatulence and acne and wrinkles, sometimes all at the same time!

In the electronic world, things are far more sanitised, and problems can be resolved by hitting the “delete” button

People need to be taught that in the real world problems occur, they cannot be avoided and they cannot be ignored, they have to be faced.

Language.

Boys do not naturally have a lexicon of words that enables them to articulate feeling, verbally or in print; they have to be taught these in an environment where it is acceptable to share thoughts and feelings with others.

Boys also need to deal with unvoiced communication and to read body language and sense mood, to interpret the unspoken feelings of others. These are things that the electronic world cannot deal with at all and so a boy is left with only a monosyllabic grunt or a raised middle finger, as tools able to be used when they try to deal with the outside world.

Know Yourself.

Students eventually have to take ownership of what they believe in and in the fullness of time they will be required to stand up and be counted for their beliefs.

The worrying thing that I often see is an attitude best summed up by Yeats when he said….

“The best lack all conviction, while the worst

Are full of passionate intensity”

It is passing strange to me that young people are willing to progress through life without a cause, or conviction.

The best environments insist that boys think deeply about their beliefs and then also are able to voice them.

Emotion.

The Western World is so dominated by the need to sell and buy and the media con job that ensures that each happens, that quite simply we do an exceedingly poor job of preparing our young people for real life!

Today we have allowed the situation to develop in which a young person has to navigate a sexual minefield with minimal direction, except that provided by media images of sexualised ideals and questionable morality.

Where decent adult direction falters, peer and media direction prevails.

In schools, we teach the biological basics quite well but a lot more than this is required and not from the withered and tired who have absolutely no connection with young people at the very height of sexual potency.

What is needed is not more titillation, which is dangerously easy to obtain in the world where the internet is only a mouse click away.

What is required from parents and from schools is much more important and rare, specifically decent advice on what it is to be a man or a woman.

Such advice comes first from a mum and dad, but it must be reinforced by the schools as well.

Discipline.

Prisons are full of men who never mastered the ability to control emotions and to think, before they act.

Discipline needs to be taught, it is not something a person is born with, and it means training the mind and body to deny the need for instant gratification, in order to work to achieve more distant but greater and more rewarding goals.

Fight or flight behaviours exhibited by boys would have been useful in the distant past, but the usefulness of this behaviour is diminished today, far more important is the ability to seek acceptance as a mature and measured member of a modern stable forward thinking society.

Practicality.

The list of “must have skills” under this heading is very long, here are only a few.

The level of ignorance over (for example) credit card use is frightening.

There is a singular inability to understand that the artificially generated need to buy things (which are mostly unnecessary) is the underpinning reason for the latest global financial crisis and that this unchecked need will lead inevitably to another crisis and one after that and so on.

The rudiments of saving and the traps to avoid when borrowing or when getting involved in get rich quick schemes need to be shared with all of our students. We could well spend a lot of time on the Micawber (a character from Dickens) principle that clearly states that happiness occurs when one spends less, than one earns.

Etiquette.

The best bit of advice comes from a B Grade movie called “Roadhouse”

The central character, a bouncer in a rough pub said to his employees that when dealing with people the core rule was to “Be Nice” and even when dealing with rude people the rule of “Being Nice” still applied.

I don’t advise you to watch the movie, but the advice from it is perfectly reasonable, a “please” and a “thank you” go a long way in making sure a person is successful in the world of work and play, as is the ability to know what formal means and knowing the art of good respectful conversation.

Responsibility.

This is one area that Shirley is working actively in as it has begun the process of teaching leadership to all of its students. This skill set involves teaching people to make correct decisions, how to lead and in turn serve others decently and well. It involves teaching people to understand that all decisions have consequences and that the decision maker needs to accept the responsibility for the decision.

Resiliency.

Truthfully life is not a veil of tears, but it does have its share of heartache.

A student must be taught to cope, without crumpling, when things go wrong and to get on with life, even if praise is not forthcoming.

While ideally, good performance must be acknowledged, equally poor performance cannot be passed off as worthy either.

Disappointment happens, as does discouragement and thus inner courage is needed. This courage must be taught, by parent and in school.

Conclusion

I reading these notes I am conscious that a lot more could be added to the list, for example I am currently exploring whether morality can be taught. In the dark corners of all institutions, distortions of the truth occur as desire replaces a commitment to do the right thing.

My interest in morality arises from the belief that I have that, we ignore the need “to feed the soul” at our peril.

In our society we tend to the shallow, we lose meaning and we fail to recognise what is truly sacred.

In doing this we produce an environment that is toxic to the soul.

To balance this Shirley aims to provide a constant stream of examples of noble action, moving and aesthetic experiences, love, wisdom and the opportunity to engage in reflection.

In doing this we work to produce The Shirley Man, actively and in conjunction with the parent community.

Are we there yet?

The answer is no, but I sense no lessening of resolve in the school as far as working to achieve this lofty ideal is concerned.

The Shirley Man

I believe strongly that the key to the continued development of our school lies in our ability to maintain the development of a positive culture, based firmly upon what we know as The Shirley Man.

The Shirley Man has its roots in The Good Man project, a joint venture by a number of schools, including Shirley Boys High School, which began after 2000 under the leadership of Celia Lashlie.

At the centre of The Good Man project was the conviction that a school which focuses solely on subject curriculum, could not prepare a young man for success in life.

This paper attempts to outline some of the vital aspects of personal development that a young man needs, but will only be delivered if parents and school work together to ensure that it is made available for young men.

The list that follows is not exhaustive, it is not meant to be, but it will outline a good deal of what is important and needed.

So what does a young man need? A serious response to that question might include the following:

· The ability to create good and positive relationships with people from all walks of life and from all ages.

· The ability to absorb and use language that expresses a wide range of emotions and feelings.

· The ability to know where one stands as far as belief and opinion is concerned, and to justify that stance.

· The ability of an individual to control emotion and impulse and to recognise that love, and sex are not necessarily the same thing.

· The ability to be practical which includes everything from the ability to manage finances, through to such as changing a tyre, painting, changing a tap washer and so on.

· The ability to treat others with respect and to be polite at all times.

· The ability to accept responsibility.

· The ability to be resilient and deal with grief and loss.

Let’s look at some of the above in greater detail.

Relationships.

I am now dealing with an increasing number of young men who are caught in the soulless electronic world of Twitter, Bebo, Facebook, SMS and MMS.

Frankly in such a world a young man’s ability to relate to other human beings is compromised. Real people get angry, they laugh and they cry, they eat too much, or too little, they get flatulence and acne and wrinkles, sometimes all at the same time!

In the electronic world, things are far more sanitised, and problems can be resolved by hitting the “delete” button

People need to be taught that in the real world problems occur, they cannot be avoided and they cannot be ignored, they have to be faced.

Language.

Boys do not naturally have a lexicon of words that enables them to articulate feeling, verbally or in print; they have to be taught these in an environment where it is acceptable to share thoughts and feelings with others.

Boys also need to deal with unvoiced communication and to read body language and sense mood, to interpret the unspoken feelings of others. These are things that the electronic world cannot deal with at all and so a boy is left with only a monosyllabic grunt or a raised middle finger, as tools able to be used when they try to deal with the outside world.

Know Yourself.

Students eventually have to take ownership of what they believe in and in the fullness of time they will be required to stand up and be counted for their beliefs.

The worrying thing that I often see is an attitude best summed up by Yeats when he said….

“The best lack all conviction, while the worst

Are full of passionate intensity”

It is passing strange to me that young people are willing to progress through life without a cause, or conviction.

The best environments insist that boys think deeply about their beliefs and then also are able to voice them.

Emotion.

The Western World is so dominated by the need to sell and buy and the media con job that ensures that each happens, that quite simply we do an exceedingly poor job of preparing our young people for real life!

Today we have allowed the situation to develop in which a young person has to navigate a sexual minefield with minimal direction, except that provided by media images of sexualised ideals and questionable morality.

Where decent adult direction falters, peer and media direction prevails.

In schools, we teach the biological basics quite well but a lot more than this is required and not from the withered and tired who have absolutely no connection with young people at the very height of sexual potency.

What is needed is not more titillation, which is dangerously easy to obtain in the world where the internet is only a mouse click away.

What is required from parents and from schools is much more important and rare, specifically decent advice on what it is to be a man or a woman.

Such advice comes first from a mum and dad, but it must be reinforced by the schools as well.

Discipline.

Prisons are full of men who never mastered the ability to control emotions and to think, before they act.

Discipline needs to be taught, it is not something a person is born with, and it means training the mind and body to deny the need for instant gratification, in order to work to achieve more distant but greater and more rewarding goals.

Fight or flight behaviours exhibited by boys would have been useful in the distant past, but the usefulness of this behaviour is diminished today, far more important is the ability to seek acceptance as a mature and measured member of a modern stable forward thinking society.

Practicality.

The list of “must have skills” under this heading is very long, here are only a few.

The level of ignorance over (for example) credit card use is frightening.

There is a singular inability to understand that the artificially generated need to buy things (which are mostly unnecessary) is the underpinning reason for the latest global financial crisis and that this unchecked need will lead inevitably to another crisis and one after that and so on.

The rudiments of saving and the traps to avoid when borrowing or when getting involved in get rich quick schemes need to be shared with all of our students. We could well spend a lot of time on the Micawber (a character from Dickens) principle that clearly states that happiness occurs when one spends less, than one earns.

Etiquette.

The best bit of advice comes from a B Grade movie called “Roadhouse”

The central character, a bouncer in a rough pub said to his employees that when dealing with people the core rule was to “Be Nice” and even when dealing with rude people the rule of “Being Nice” still applied.

I don’t advise you to watch the movie, but the advice from it is perfectly reasonable, a “please” and a “thank you” go a long way in making sure a person is successful in the world of work and play, as is the ability to know what formal means and knowing the art of good respectful conversation.

Responsibility.

This is one area that Shirley is working actively in as it has begun the process of teaching leadership to all of its students. This skill set involves teaching people to make correct decisions, how to lead and in turn serve others decently and well. It involves teaching people to understand that all decisions have consequences and that the decision maker needs to accept the responsibility for the decision.

Resiliency.

Truthfully life is not a veil of tears, but it does have its share of heartache.

A student must be taught to cope, without crumpling, when things go wrong and to get on with life, even if praise is not forthcoming.

While ideally, good performance must be acknowledged, equally poor performance cannot be passed off as worthy either.

Disappointment happens, as does discouragement and thus inner courage is needed. This courage must be taught, by parent and in school.

Conclusion

I reading these notes I am conscious that a lot more could be added to the list, for example I am currently exploring whether morality can be taught. In the dark corners of all institutions, distortions of the truth occur as desire replaces a commitment to do the right thing.

My interest in morality arises from the belief that I have that, we ignore the need “to feed the soul” at our peril.

In our society we tend to the shallow, we lose meaning and we fail to recognise what is truly sacred.

In doing this we produce an environment that is toxic to the soul.

To balance this Shirley aims to provide a constant stream of examples of noble action, moving and aesthetic experiences, love, wisdom and the opportunity to engage in reflection.

In doing this we work to produce The Shirley Man, actively and in conjunction with the parent community.

Are we there yet?

The answer is no, but I sense no lessening of resolve in the school as far as working to achieve this lofty ideal is concerned.

“The woods are lovely dark and deep

But I have promises to keep

And miles to go before I sleep

And miles to go before I sleep.”

John Laurenson

Published in: on June 11, 2010 at 9:32 am  Comments (3)  

Realising the Value – I love this!

To realize
The value of a sister/brother
Ask  someone
Who doesn’t have one.


To realize
The value of ten years:
Ask a  newly
Divorced couple.


To realize
The value of four  years:
Ask a graduate.


To realize
The  value of one year:
Ask a student who
Has failed a final  exam.


To realize The value of nine  months:
Ask a mother who gave birth to a  stillborn.

To realize
The value of one  month:
Ask a mother
Who has given birth to
A premature  baby….

To realize
The value of one  week:
Ask an editor of a weekly newspaper.

To realize
The  value of one minute:
Ask a person
Who has missed the train, bus or  plane.

To realize
The value of one-second:
Ask a  person
Who has survived an accident.

Time waits for  no one.

Treasure every moment you  have.

You will treasure it even more when
You can  share it with someone special.

To  realize the value of a friend or family member:

LOSE  ONE.

Published in: on May 20, 2010 at 7:29 pm  Leave a Comment  

Stace Hopper’s small plane crashed today

Stace’s small plane crashed while attempting to take off at Marsden Cove Marina when a gust of wind caught it and it landed on a parked car before it caught fire. The three passengers in the car received moderate injuries. Stace was a member of a prominent property development group. Leave a message of condolence

Published in: on March 12, 2010 at 10:25 pm  Leave a Comment  

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Published in: on March 12, 2010 at 1:16 am  Leave a Comment  
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